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Pitching and Asking Relevant Questions

This article is written by Munira Hussein, a Contributor Author at Startup Istanbul.

You have come this far with your fundraising process. It must have been engaging but also exciting. All the experiences, lessons and insights. You are a lot more knowledgeable now. Let’s pitch, shall we?

Carry out a further research about your potential investors. Find out other businesses they have invested in, what kind of investments they do and any other information that will help you understand them better. Do not waste resources on investors who are not in your line of business. Focus on those who get your ideas and values.

Once you have earned yourself the pitch meeting, you want to be the one taking the lead. You can say something like “I will be presenting a three-minute deck. Please stop me if you have any questions or discussions around certain points that I make.” Be confident and organize your ideas. You don’t want to come this far and mess it up by being fearful. The belief is that you have as much faith or even more in your idea as the investors that have given you their audience.

Don’t assume that the investors have read the documents you sent them. Present your deck to them and pitch. Don’t make the mistake of going into the room and asking them to ask you questions with the assumption that they have read the deck. Insist on the benefits that the milestones the business has made and ensure you have your facts and data right. Make them feel like yours is the next big thing then go ahead and put in all the effort to make it so.

Ensure you ask your potential investors as many questions as they ask you. The best investors will appreciate that. It’s a partnership in the end, remember? Be clear about the next step. Ask questions that will lead you to understand your investors even better. Some of the questions you can ask are:

  1. What are you looking for in a business before you invest?
  2. Does my business fit your thesis?
  3. How do you help your founders?
  4. What have you done or invested in in the past?

Make the pitch conversational so that you can both get to understand each other.

When you start getting the commitments, reach out to the people that you had reached out to. It doesn’t matter whether they responded or not. Give them update on the business and the investors that have come on board. Once they find out that people they know have put in capital, they might want to do the same.

Remove the friction from the signing process. You can use DocuSign or HelloSign. Find out which works best for you and is likely to secure your business.

Close your deals, get back to work and put the money to use.

─ May 15, 2020